The Story Of An Hour Summary Essay

The Story Of An Hour Summary Essay-7
“There would be no one to live for in those coming years; she would live for herself" begins the paragraph.There are no lively words, just a matter of fact, unemotional statement without the slightest hint of sadness.All five incorporate at least one of the themes in “The Story of an Hour” and are broad enough so that it will be easy to find textual support, yet narrow enough to provide a focused clear thesis statement.

The narrator of “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin relates what she observes in simple prose, but when her emotions are described, the words are vibrant and powerful.

This suggests that Louis has a deep inner-life that is not connected to the outside world of her husband or friends and the fact that she cloisters herself in her room to discover her feelings is important.

Much like an affliction, she cannot feel free unless the agent, her husband, is no longer present.

The fact that it affects her heart as opposed to any other portion of her body shows that her misery from this symbolic disease stems from something inside of her, not anything external.

For instance, in one of the important quotes from “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin, it is clear that her husband loved her when his face is described as “the face that had never looked save with love upon her." Her own feelings of love in return are also minimally described and it is clear that she does not share his sentiments.

The narrator relates in one of the quotes from “Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin, “And yet she loved him—sometimes.In terms of language and her emotions, it is interesting that Louise’s feelings are described as a “monstrous joy" since this matches her feelings and well-described strong emotions.There go from calm and passive to wild and uninhibited and the only way the reader can discern what means the most to her is by these passages describing this joy that is monstrous not only because it overwhelms her, but because she knows that she shouldn’t feel the way she does about her husband’s death—that the world of the dull reality would consider her reaction “monstrous" in itself.The world outside of her own bedroom is only minimally described, but the world inside of her mind is lively and well described by the narrator.The window outside of her room is alive and vibrant like her mind, while everything about her physically is cloistered.In fact, almost as though she suddenly realizes again that she doesn’t need to be sad—that marriage is an unhappy institution for her, she comes to life again through language and sentence structure as seen in a meaningful passage from “Story of an Hour” such as, “There will be no powerful will bending hers in that blind persistence with which men and women believe they have a right to impose a private will upon a fellow creature." Phrases such as “powerful will" and “blind persistence" are much more descriptive and full of energy than any she uses to describe the fact that she had no one to live for.Also, this seems to escape in one breath, as one long rant, only to lead back into the clipped sentence of “And yet she loved him—sometimes" which makes the reader keenly aware of the contrasts in numbness and almost manic emotion.For instance, in the above citation which begins with the very simple statement in one of the quotes from “Story of an Hour”, “And yet she loved him—sometimes.Often she did not" which demonstrates emotional passivity, but as the short paragraph continues and her true emotions come to the forefront, the language comes alive along with her character.This happens again a few paragraphs before this instance when she is speaking in one of the quotes about the strain and crippling “disease" of marriage.When her emotions become overwhelming, so do the sentences and language.

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